Serbian version of article can be downloaded bellow.

The Environmental Protection Agency of Serbia (SEPA) publishes once per month the data on “detected hourly and daily breaches of maximum values of air-polluting particles”.

We hereby draw your attention to the monthly report for January 2017.

In addition to our recommendation to review this report, we invite you to join us in seeking additional answers from the SEPA so as to enable easier comprehension and understanding of the data published to date.

The following are the questions needing answers for an improved understanding of the published numbers and tables and of the scope and reliability of measurements presented:

  1. The list presents 13 (measuring) stations. Among them there is no measuring station BEOGRAD OMLADINSKIH BRIGADA (RS3022A). Should this be taken to mean that this station did not record breaches of hourly or daily maximum values for any pollutant?
  2. The list presents 13 (measuring) stations. Among them there is no measuring station BEOGRAD OBRENOVAC (RS3031A). Should this be taken to mean that this station did not record breaches of hourly or daily maximum values for any pollutant?
  3. Should the presented information be interpreted to mean that measuring station VALJEVO (RS1041A) has not recorded any breach of PM10 ceiling[1]? If not, do you know what has changed there in comparison to 2015 when this station recorded 174 days with exceeded daily maximum values? Does this station still measure PM10 values today?
  4. Should the presented information be interpreted to mean that measuring station SREMSKA MITROVICA (RS1010A) has not recorded any breach of PM10 ceiling? If NOT, do you know what has changed there in comparison to 2015 when this station recorded 145 days with exceeded daily maximum values? Does this station still measure PM10 values today?
  5. Should the presented information be interpreted to mean that measuring station KRAGUJEVAC (RS1046A) has not recorded any breach of PM10 ceiling? If not, do you know what has changed there in comparison to 2015 when this station recorded 120 days with exceeded daily maximum values? Does this station still measure PM10 values today?
  6. Should the presented information be interpreted to mean that measuring station BEOGRAD VRAČAR (RS1026A) has not recorded any breach of PM10 ceiling? If not, do you know what has changed there in comparison to 2015 when this station recorded 83 days with exceeded daily maximum values? Does this station still measure PM10 values today?
  7. Should the presented information be interpreted to mean that measuring station PANČEVO VATROGASNI DOM (RS4015A) has not recorded any breach of PM10 ceiling? If not, do you know what has changed there in comparison to 2015 when this station recorded 97 days with exceeded daily maximum values? Does this station still measure PM10 values today?
  8. Should the presented information be interpreted to mean that measuring station PANČEVO VOJLOVICA (RS4017A) has not recorded any breach of PM10 ceiling? If not, do you know what has changed there in comparison to 2015 when this station recorded 85 days with exceeded daily maximum values? Does this station still measure PM10 values today?
  9. Should the presented information be interpreted to mean that measuring station UŽICE (RS1052A) has not recorded any breach of PM10 ceiling? If not, do you know what has changed there in comparison to 2015 when this station recorded 146 days with exceeded daily maximum values? Does this station still measure PM10 values today?
  10. Are there any stations from which the number of days with values exceeding allowed maximums in January 2017 will be reported at later date? If yes, when will they be published and in what format?
  11. The list, for example, does not include data from Kraljevo. Should this be taken to mean that the measuring station KRALJEVO (RS1053A) has not recorded breaches of maximum PM10 values in January 2017?

[1] Atmospheric particulate matter – also known as particulate matter (PM) or particulates – are microscopic solid or liquid matter suspended in the Earth’s atmosphere. Particulates are the deadliest form of air pollution due to their ability to penetrate deep into the lungs and bloodstreams unfiltered, causing permanent DNA mutations, heart attacks, and premature death

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